\

Sour Cream Apple Pie: A PA Dutch Recipe

I cannot believe it’s been 7 months since my last blog post.  Yikes.

Not much of a post here, but I did want to get the recipe down quickly for a friend who requested it.  If you love apple pie, I would highly encourage you to try this recipe.  It’s an adaptation of a Pennsylvania Dutch recipe and the sour cream makes it irresistible.  I doubt I will ever make a “plain” apple pie again.  It’s that good.  I added cranberries because husband likes sour, and you could easily add raisins or other berries or just use straight up apples.  I used half Granny Smith and half Hidden Rose apples.  Since we moved to Washington in August, it’s been Appletopia.  I’ve never seen so many varieties and so readily available . . . meaning even on the side of the road.

img_2397

Here’s the recipe:

CRUST:

I almost always use the a recipe for my pie crusts I adapted from Allison Kave’s  book “First Prize Pies.”  The crust tastes so good sometimes I’ll underbake it and make a double or 1.5 batch to have a thicker chewier crust.  Not normal or traditional, but tasty.  For one double-crust 9 – inch (23 cm) pie, use 225 g unsalted COLD COLD COLD butter , 1/2 cup COLD buttermilk (you can use milk plus 1 Tbsp cider vinegar and let milk sit for half an hour), 340 g all purpose CHILLED flour, 1 Tbsp. cornstarch, 2 Tbsp sugar, 1 1/2 tsp salt.

  • Cut your butter up into small 1/2 inch cubes, and return to freezer or fridge.
  • Toss flour, cornstarch, sugar and salt together.  Cut in butter with tool of choice but try not to use hands as they will heat up the butter.  But you can also use a Cuisinart.  Just don’t overmix.  You want small, pea-sized chunks.  Be light and quick.
  • Spread mixture out onto a flat COLD surface (such as a chilled cutting board).  You want a lot of surface area.  Then drizzle half of your liquid over the flour mixture , lightly toss with bench scraper or fork, and repeat with second half of liquid.  When dough will come together with still visible little pieces of butter against the side of a bowl, gather into a ball and chill in fridge for at least 1 hour.

FILLING:

You’ll need 5 cups sliced apples.  I don’t peel any more, mostly out of laziness.  But I do core them.  I also added 1/2 cup stewed cranberries that I sweetened with orange zest & juice and about 1/4 cup sugar.  Also 2 Tbsp apple cider, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 Tbsp all purpose flour, 1/4 tsp salt, 1 large egg plus 1 egg yolk, 1 cup sour cream, 1/3 cup half and half or heavy whipping cream, and 2 tsp vanilla extract.

  • First you want to steam the apples in the cider vinegar over medium heat, just for a few minutes.  You may have to do in batches.  You don’t want applesauce, you just want to remove the rawness of the apples and prevent undercooked apples in your pie.  Let them cool after steaming.  I do this because I like bigger chunks of apples instead of thin slices, but I don’t like them undercooked.
  • In a bowl, combine sugar, flour and salt.  Whisk.  Add egg and yolk, sour cream, half and half or cream, and vanilla.  Stir in apples.  Pour mix into chilled pie shell.
  • Bake pie at 400 degrees for 15 minutes.
  • Reduce temperature to 350 degrees for 15 minutes while you make the crumb topping.

TOPPING:

  • For crumb topping, combine 1 cup flour, 1/2 cup sugar, 1/3 cup packed brown sugar, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, 1/4 tsp salt, 3/4 cup chopped pecans or walnuts (optional), and 6 tablespoons unsalted chilled butter cut into chunks.  Mix together with fork or hands.
  • After the pie has baked 30 minutes, remove it from the oven and spread topping over pie.  Return pie to oven for 20 – 25 minutes. Cool and serve!img_2399Also submitted in eager anticipation of Fiesta Friday #147.

 

 

 

How to Bake a Pie On Top of a Salted Caramel Bar

Have you ever had a salted caramel bar?   Read More

Little Red Riding Ribbon

ribbon (1 of 1)

Guess what? I won 2nd prize in the savory category of pies in the 6th Annual KCRW Good Food Pie Contest for the “Mr. Fitz Pork Pie!”  Thank you all dear friends for keeping your fingers crossed, it was one of the most awesome days I’ve had in years.   Read More

Deep in Pie-land

Warning:  I’m about to bombard you with pie photos.  I promise recipes will follow after this weekend. Read More

Apple-Lakrids Pie (Apple + Black Liquorice) with Rye Crust

I’m not sure what business apples have growing right now in Redondo Beach, CA, but when my husband texted me the other day, “Hey Sue, I just picked some apples from our school’s community garden tree, do you think you can make a pie?”, I figured, why not?  I’ll make an apple-black liquorice pie and bring it to Fiesta Friday #22. Just what you would do in the middle of summer, right?

IMG_5419

These apples were very odd-shaped!

The poor fella thinks he’s getting a normal All-American apple pie, but he’s not, so I’m keeping my fingers crossed. See I’ve had black liquorice on my brain ever since reading about New York’s $10 latte — the libation made with the wonderfully sweet and pungent raw Danish black liquorice powder called Lakrids, served at Budin, and I wanted to see if I could incorporate the flavor of black liquorice into a pie.

Fine-Powder_large_large

I thought since fennel paired well with apples, that the flavor of wild fennel (which I thought was the same as liquorice) would pair well with apple in a pie.  Also my husband was really going to town on the black liquorice chews I’d bought for my homemade attempt at the $10 latte, so I thought he might like it in his apple pie!

It all started with our walk a couple weeks ago when we spotted acres of wild anise growing on the side of the road and the smell was making me dizzy (in a good way) . . . which led to wild fennel tea . . . and deviled eggs with fennel pollen.  Then I read about the Danish liquorice latte and made one at home earlier this week.

IMG_5339

Our Version of the Budin Lakrids Latte

As I was researching black liquorice, however, I was really surprised to find that it is not botanically related to fennel, even though the flavor is almost identical. The liquorice plant is a legume that is native to southern Europe and parts of Asia. It is not botanically related to anise, star anise, or fennel, which are sources of similar flavouring compounds. Most liquorice is actually used as a flavoring agent for tobacco.  Liquorice in candy/chew form is popular in Scandinavian countries, and in Italy (particularly in the South) and Spain in its natural form. The root of the plant is simply dug up, washed and chewed as a mouth freshener. Throughout Italy unsweetened liquorice is consumed in the form of small black pieces made only from 100% pure liquorice extract; the taste is bitter and intense. In Calabria a popular liqueur is made from pure liquorice extract. Liquorice is also very popular in Syria where it is sold as a drink.

Liquorice is reported to treat gastrointestinal disorders, including stomach ulcers, as well as bronchitis.  It is also used topically to treat skin disorders such as excema and psoriasis.  Moreover, liquorice extract is a known natural brightening agent for skin pigmentation disorders or irritation.

I thought the liquorice flavor, with apples, would pair nicely with a rye flour crust, so I made an all-butter crust with half whole grain rye flour (that I got, freshly milled, at San Francisco’s The Mill, a joint venture between Josey the Baker and Blue Bottle Coffee).

Here’s the Recipe:

IMG_5417

Peel and Core 4 medium sized apples

Slice Apples 1/4 inch thick and soak in water with juice of 1/2 lemon

Slice Apples 1/4 inch thick and soak in water with juice of 1/2 lemon

Prepare a Pie Crust using half all purpose flour, half rye flour, sugar, salt and butter.  See my lemon meringue pie recipe for a standard pie dough recipe.

Prepare a Pie Crust using half all purpose flour, half rye flour, sugar, salt and butter. See my lemon meringue pie recipe for a standard pie dough recipe.

After pre-baking pie crust, fill with filling:  4 oz. black licorice, 1 Tbps Lakrids powder, 2 egg yolks and 1 egg blended for 2 minutes in a blender.

After pre-baking pie crust, fill with filling: 4 oz. black liquorice, 1 Tbps Lakrids powder, 2 egg yolks and 1 egg blended for 2 minutes in a blender.

Toss Apple slices with a pinch of flour and sugar and water and place over licorice filling

Toss Apple slices with a pinch of flour and sugar and water and place over licorice filling

Cover pie with foil or parchment and cook for 20 minutes at 425 degrees.  Uncover and cook at 375 degrees for 20 more minutes.

Cover pie with foil or parchment and cook for 20 minutes at 425 degrees. Uncover and cook at 375 degrees for 20 more minutes.

Let the pie cool for at least 1/2 hour.  Serve with raw apple slices and raw fennel fronds if you like, which nicely brightens the earthiness of the rye crust.

IMG_1313_2

*Update:  he liked it!

IMG_1316_2